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10+ Wineries With Absolutely Stunning Architecture

Opus One

Scott Johnson of Johnson, Fain & Pereira designed this iconic winery and finished the build in 1991. It brings together traditional European architectural elements and New World aesthetics, a combination that mirrors their epic Cabernet.

opus-one

Bodegas Ysios

This spectacular winery is located in Spain’s Rioja region, and was designed by Santiago Calatrava, completed in 2001. The undulating aluminum and cedar roof mimics the mountainous terrain surrounding it, and the name honors Isis and Osiris, two Egyptian gods with close ties to the world of wine.

Bodegas-Ysios

Castello di Amorosa

Dario Sattui wanted to build one of the most impressive wineries in the area, and did so by importing an actual castle from Italy, piece by piece, and reassembling it in Napa Valley.

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Lapostolle Clos Apalta

Alexandra Marnier Lapostolle, most known for producing Grand Marinier, began making wine in Chile and completed this estate in 2004. It was designed by Amercanda Architects and features six levels reminiscent of a bird’s nest.

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Vik Winery

When Alex and Carrie Vik wanted to build a winery in Chile, they hosted a competition and this was the winning submission. It features a long, low slung building positioned in the middle of their 11,000 acre estate in Santiago. The shallow pool dotted by boulders not only looks cool, but also keeps the underground levels cool.

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Darioush Winery

Located in Napa, this iconic winery pays honor to its owner’s Persian roots.

Darioush-Winery

Dornier Winery

The only winery here that was actually designed by its founder, Christopher Dornier. It’s located in South Africa and was meant to blend seamlessly with its surroundings.

Dornier-Winery

Irius Winery

A distinctly modern winery in Spain, the building was meant to resemble a butterfly.

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Ledson Winery

This massive Sonoma winery became famous before the wine did, and attracted so much attention that they figured they should make some wine and open a tasting room.

Ledson-winery

Marques De Riscal

One of the most distinct wineries in the world, this beautiful structure is located in Elciego Spain and was completed in 2006 by Frank Gehry. The pink and titanium exterior looks like a ribbon as it wraps around the surface.

Marques-De-Riscal

Mission Hill Winery

This Canadian winery is most noted for its 12-story bell tower which welcomes guests with its bell.

mission-hillPetra Winery

Near the old Tuscan village of Suvereto you’ll find this masterpiece, designed by Swiss architect Mario Botta. It was completed in 2003 and features a unique cylindrical core with plants on the roof.

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Bodegas Portia

Set amidst a barren looking valley, this winery in Ribera del Duero is one of Spains most distinct wineries. It looks like something out of Star Wars and the modern building was designed by Foster + Partners and opened in 2010.

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These 3D Floors Will Have You Trippin Out

You thought your fancy marble tiles were impressive enough huh? Imagine walking into a bathroom and feeling like you just slipped into a tropical underwater paradise, or the floor of a sunken battleship.

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There’s a new trend in bathroom flooring and it comes in the form of 3D epoxy polymer, a special material that creates an incredibly realistic perception of depth that just might terrify your young children, not to mention any unsuspecting guest you have over.

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The technique involves layering any desired image on the level floor and covering it with a transparent two-component polymer that gives it depth. Imperial Interiors, the company behind these fantastic installs, says the technique was originally used in mall displays. Now we’re seeing it invade people’s bathrooms, and even extending into their other living spaces in a most creative fashion.

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Your cat will no doubt become incredibly frustrated with your new interior decorator.

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The floors aren’t limited to bathrooms either – consider a tropical paradise theme in your wine bar perhaps.

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The sense of depth in some of the applications is simply astonishing!

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One of my favorites is the flooding water shooting from beneath the bathtub.

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Don’t mind Flipper saying hello while you do your business.

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Take it to the next level by applying images to the walls, cabinets, even the ceiling.

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Photo via: artflooring.biz

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There’s no doubt how cool some of these floors are. Our biggest concern though is they might be so distracting while taking a leak that you forget where you’re aiming…

Raw Concrete Home Wedged Between Rocks And Earth

A bit of imagination and a crate of dynamite was all it took for Olsen Kundig Architects to turn this giant bolder into a luxurious, modern dream home. Raw materials such as exposed concrete were used to compliment the natural feel of the rocky backdrop which flanks the home on two sides. There are even areas where the remnants of the existing stone pokes though on the interior, creating a grotto like feel that offsets the stark finishes that accompany the new space.

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The home was outfitted with rustic antique furniture and artwork, which matches the rugged design.

The-Pierre-by-Olson-Kundig-Architects_dezeen_5 The-Pierre-by-Olson-Kundig-Architects_dezeen_6Leftover rock from the construction was crushed into a work of art and mounted on the wall.

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The bathroom includes a sink basin carved into stone, with three separate bowls where the water cascades through before draining.

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The-Pierre-by-Olson-Kundig-Architects_dezeen_14Photography is by Benjamin Benschneider and Dwight Eschliman

A See-Through Church That Suspends Disbelief

Spaces of prayer and worship have traditionally been designed create suspension of disbelief in order to give the users a grander sense of a higher being. This church, designed by Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, does just that by appearing to be completely see-through.

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Layers of rusted steel ribs are stacked upon each other with spacers that create gaps between each piece. The result is a structure that is more translucent than it is opaque, allowing light, air and views to flow into one exterior wall and out the other.

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The ephemeral church blends majestically into the surrounding Belgian hillside, especially when backlit by the rising or setting sun. It won’t protect you from rain, wind, floods or snow, but it will provide a serene setting to appreciate the things greater than yourself.

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This Unique “Ultra Green” Building Is Covered In A Green-Wall Exoskeleton

Brazilian architecture firm Triptyque have designed an office building in Sao Paolo that not only collects rain water, but utilizes a sophisticated filtration and delivery system to irrigate naturally insulating green walls. A maze-like network of water pipes snake up and down the building’s facades, fitted with misters that provide the living walls with freshly recycled rain water.

The project is an ecological experiment aimed at challenging how society deals with water – how it can be collected, recycled, and redistributed with little need for waste or run-off. In addition to the green wall system, a series of planted roofs further mitigate the structures environmental footprint. When the misting nozzles are on full tilt, the building is enveloped in what appears to be a stationary cloud, reinforcing the issue of water conservation in both function and aesthetic.

In 2010, the unique green features won this office building the ‘Built Environment’ award from the Zumtobel Group.