Architecture

Home Architecture

Off-the-Grid Sustainable Masterpiece of New Zealand

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Jeff Hobbs, ex-boat and cabinet-maker, founded his newest venture, Room to Move, in anticipation that the tiny house movement would continue its momentum and to introduce the movement to the people of New Zealand. In this project for his client, Briar Hale, the craftsmanship, attention to detail, and meticulous planning that Jeff puts into his work is showcased flawlessly in the end result of this home. This tiny home was built in the spirit of sustainability, from the solar panels to the salvaged native wood used for construction material. New Zealand should be proud to host these futuristic, sustainable homes!

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home’s sustainability.

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for providing the home with hot water.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for water-heating.

The kitchen in all of its glory: kauri bench tops, hand-crafted ceramic sink, gas stove, and a 130-liter solar fridge.

The kitchen is fully featured, with kauri bench tops, a hand crafted ceramic sink, gas stove-oven, and a 130 liter solar fridge. All available spaces haven been transformed to offer ample storage.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for sleepless nights of stargazing.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for stargazing and access to the various systems on the roof.

Disgusting Old Cave Turned Into A Seriously Luxurious Home

23-year-old Alexis Lamoureux’s story is a familiar one. The French national from a picturesque French village on the banks of the Loire River was left scrambling after losing his bartending job at a struggling local bar. He and his girlfriend faced few options pitted against soaring housing prices that plagued many European nations.

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Where Alexis’ story goes from there? Not so common. An opportunity presented itself in the form of what some would describe as a troglodyte home that was once owned by his great aunt. Call it what you will, it’s basically a decrepit old network of hallways and rooms carved into the side of a mountain. In other words, it’s a cave. Add in 25 years of neglect and a heaping pile of garbage and you’ve got yourself the situation Alexis found himself in after purchasing the home from auction for the towering sum of 1 euro.

The transformation that took place next is nothing short of astonishing as you can see.

Stylish Home Built From Recycled Wood Could Be Seattle’s Most Efficient Dwelling Ever

The team at Dwell Development has been working on a pretty incredible project in Seattle, building a 2000+ square foot home using mostly recycled and reclaimed material. Focusing on sustainability first and foremost, the team aims to garner a Built Green Emerald Star certification, which would be the first such certification awarded in the whole city.

The roof boasts a large 6.6 kW solar setup, which powers the entire home. Windows were placed to maximize natural light benefits, and nearly every design aspect was built with both aesthetics and energy in mind. Other features they added include the heat recovery ventilation system and a water heating system that uses 78 percent less energy than a normal system.

The exterior and framing of the home includes FSC-certified timber, with paneling from reclaimed Douglas fir. The room was made from reclaimed steel sourced from a cannery in Willamette Valley, and most of the interior finishes like the cabinets, countertops, and tile were made by local craftsmen.





9 Most Amazing Green Roofs In The World

Green roofs have plenty to offer. Not only are they architecturally interesting, they have a drastic effect on reducing a building’s carbon footprint. Covering any roof in a thick layer of properly drained vegetation naturally insulates the interior, but also absorbs heat that would typically be reflected back into the sky, preventing all kinds of ecological problems on a large enough scale.

Architects have taken notice, and are beginning to embrace green roofs as a focal point of their designs. Here are 9 green roofs that will knock your socks off (which is good, because no one wants to walk on grass with socks on).

1 | 8 House | Bjark Ingles Group (BIG)

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BIG is known for going…well…big! This green roof is no different. The symmetrical shed roofs provide the perfect opportunity for the dual cascading green carpets that meet at an exterior courtyard at the base of the structure. (source)

2 | CR Land Guanganmen Green Tech Showroom | Vector Architects

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When a green roof isn’t enough, why no couple it with some green walls? Vector Architects have left no exterior sufrace naked, creating an extruded square shell that naturally protects the interiors from swings in temperature. (source)

3 | California Academy Of Sciences | Renzo Piano

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If I didn’t use ‘undulating’ and ‘elegant’ in the same sentence to describe this one I’d have an angry gathering of former architecture professors burning me at the stake (not literally). Mr. Piano is a master of his craft, and this is one of the truly iconic contemporary buildings in the Western Hemisphere. (source)

4 | Marcel Sembat High School | archi5

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High school has changed a lot since my day. This beautiful structure is highlighted by the (don’t say undulating…don’t say undulating) faceted curvilinear roof structure (nailed it). (source)

5 | Beijing Capital International Airport | Foster + Partners

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In a stroke of perfect irony, visitors to the world’s most industrial, pollutant contributing city are greeted with one of the world’s most sprawling green roof. China is no stranger to environmental paradox, as they are a leader in sustainable development, yet continue to degrade the planet through their bustling industry. (source)

6 | School of Art, Media, and Design | CPG

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Two interlocking sloped green roofs wrap around a central public space in this project by Singapore based firm CPG. The roofs are accessilble to visitors, providing a lush carpet to make a picinic and take in a view of the surrounding Nanyang. (source)

7 | Villa Bio | Enric Ruiz-Geli

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Spanish architect Enric Ruiz-Geli designed this home intented to reflect the landscape of the area. Even though it’s surrounded by homes that are less-than-camouflage, the green roof acts as a bridge between natural and man-made.(source)

8 | Chicago City Hall | City of Chicago

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In 2001, the City of Chicago tasked a team of architects, landscape architects and engineers to design and build a 38,800 square feet of green space. It is an initiative that makes great strides towards covering our cities in  well-manicured lawns. (source)

9 | Vancouver Convention Center | LMN + DA with MCM

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A lush carpet of green velvet covers this convention center, which sits in a prestigious waterfront site in the heart of downtown Vancouver, BC. The architectural team created a man-made peninsula that mirrors the surrounding landscape. (source)

This 768sf Space Is Pure Eye Nectar For the Minimalist Home Lover

Wishbone has been at the top of the list of best tiny house builders for some time, so it’s no surprise they also design some pretty stylish ADUs (accessory dwelling units). Just check out this lovely offering, dubbed the “Schilling”. It’s bright, airy, and provides more than enough room to stretch your legs, while still maintaining a very small footprint, making it a perfect in-law or income property for the spacious backyard.

It Looks Like A 200-Year-Old Crumbling Home, But Inside It’s A Different Story

We know not to judge a book by its cover, or in this case a home by its exterior. This 200-year-old stone house in Linescio, Switzerland certainly proves that better than most anything we’ve seen. Even as you walk around the outside and see the crumbling stone walls right in front of your face, you’d have a hard time believing it was recently renovated. That’s because it was only renovated on the inside.

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Buchner Bründler Architekten completed this unique restoration that basically involved building a home within a home. They left the exterior more or less untouched, and built a fresh interior shell using a minimalist design approach. While the outside still retains the rugged stones that made up the original walls, the inside now has fresh concrete surfaces and modern finishes throughout. Each concrete slab was carefully brought inside and assembled; tall wood shutters fold open to reveal the original window frames, a new bathtub was sunk into the concrete floor, and a single slab was used for the kitchen counter.

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The Amazing “Ridge House” Glows Like A Lighthouse

Cape Cod is home to this two-story vacation home that breathes contemporary architectural life into age-old formal expressions. Massachusetts based Hammer Architects designed a house – aptly named the “Ridge House,” – that uses a towering gabled roof form to echo the traditional craftsman look, while juxtaposing a see-through interior that screams modernity. The entire second floor, which contains the main living spaces, is transparent, making the exposed roof appear as if it’s floating above almost completely unsupported. This effect is especially noticeable at night, when the interior glows like a Chinese lantern.

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Originally, the client wished for a single-story floor plan, but the architects convinced them to stack the spaces to increase the dramatic effect of the roof. I’d say it worked. Traditional materials such as wood shingles are applied in new and interesting ways, again paying homage to historic building commonalities. Bedroom and service spaces occupy the lower floor, allowing the living, kitchen and dining spaces to sit above and enjoy sprawling views of the lush countryside.

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The home is, arguably, best seen at night, when the massive glazed openings glow like a distant lighthouse. Many of which pepper the coast of Cape Cod.

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An exterior deck hangs off the main living floor, allowing the interior spaces to spill out over the adjacent hill and providing an even more spectacular view of the surrounding countryside.

North-Pamet-Ridge-House-by-Hammer-3 Everything on the interior is exposed. Here is a look at the open kitchen that looks directly at the dining and living areas. The floor plan is narrow, but efficient and plentiful.

North-Pamet-Ridge-House-by-Hammer-6 Another look at the second floor. The interior partition wall is a post-modern play on traditional architecture style.

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Sleek Forest Home Where The Forest Is Actually In The Home

Building a home often means flattening the plot of land set to be developed, effectively destroying what made the site interesting in the first place. However, when trying to design something truly beautiful we find that architecture can only be as good as the land it embraces.

Meet the Casa Corallo by Guatemalan based architecture firm Paz Arquitectura. Rather than uprooting the trees that natively inhabited the building site, they literally designed the home around the natural vegetation. Towering trees flank, loom, and even pierce through the home in a way that blends existing and new in elegant symbiosis.
casa-corallo-modern-house-architecture-1 Two trees frame the entry of the mostly concrete home. The harsh material was used to provide ironic contrast between natural and man-made.casa-corallo-modern-house-architecture-2 casa-corallo-modern-house-architecture-6 The home spill down the natural slope of the hillside as a stone path melts together with low brush.casa-corallo-modern-house-architecture-8 The interiors are highlighted by tree trunks that climb up through the floors. In many cases, the location of the trees dictated the spatial organization.
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While the home is large and imposing, the choice to involve the trees so prominently in the design speaks to the sensitivity the architect had towards the land.

This Sleek Shipping Container Studio Hides Among The Trees

In the last 10 years we’ve seen a massive influx of structures being designed and build using recycled shipping containers. Take for example this forest studio, which transforms the rugged steel boxes into sublime interiors, all the while celebrating the rough aesthetic of the corrugated steel exterior. Large glazed openings insert into the open ends of the container allowing for sweeping views of the surrounding foliage.

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The interiors are minimal and white, allowing the surrounding forest to be the star of the show.

Container-Studio-03-850x559Container-Studio-04Container-Studio-05-850x566Container-Studio-06-850x557At night the studio glows like a tiny jewel box in the middle of the dense trees.

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Multiple containers are fitted together to extend the limited footprint that a single container can occupy. The studio was designed by Maziar Behrooz Architecture as part of their Insta_Houses series of pre-fabricated homes.

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Photos by: Dalton Portella & Francine Fleischer

This Crooked House Warps The Mind With Its Crazy Facade

Like the twisted beauty of the Polish language, the Krzywy Domek or “Crooked House” by Szotyńscy & Zaleski elegantly distorts familiar architectural convention. The street-facing facade presents an unusual collage of undulating forms that looks like it was tailor-made for the setting of Disney’s next animated film.

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The building is a popular destination on Sopot, Poland’s famed Monte Cassino Street, and contains shops, restaurants and cafés. A central gazed section is bookended by two stucco masses that would resemble traditional vernacular if they weren’t pinched and bulbed to appear more fantastical. The architects were inspired by the illustrations of Jan Marcin Szancer and Per Dahlberg in addition to legendary Spanish architect Antonio Gaudi.

Krzywy-Domek-Crooked-House_8At night, the structure glows like a warped jack-o-lantern. The deep-set window openings cast dramatic shadows adding to the dream-like appearance of the facade.

Krzywy-Domek-Crooked-House_2 Krzywy-Domek-Crooked-House_3 Krzywy-Domek-Crooked-House_4 Krzywy-Domek-Crooked-House_5 The inside follows suit, imitating the the same playful forms and details, seamlessly blending the conceptual force behind the design’s iconic exterior.

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