Small & Tiny

Home Architecture Small & Tiny

Tour this incredible beach cottage with us

The small island of Camano Island in Washington is a popular tourist destination. And Whidbey Camano Islands has everything you want in a secluded getaway far from the city life. It’s accessible to Vancouver and Seattle, and makes a perfect escape – especially if you have a chance to stay somewhere like this tiny beach cottage.

Moving Walls Bring A Radical Change To This Small Home

As the downsizing trend expands and more people take to living in tiny or small homes, the need for smart organization and versatility in these spaces becomes more evident. Figuring out ways to make an object work two shifts becomes an important part of the design. PKMN Architecture’s “All I Own House” demonstrates an interesting solution that involves walls that move in order to increase the usability of a small space.

7_moving-walls 5_moving-walls 3_moving-walls

Yolanda R. Pila inherited her grandmother’s rather small single story home, and reached out to PKMN for some help. The result was a project that “materializes the interior of a house through its inhabitant personal belongings.” – or in layman’s terms, a house that moves as needed.


The design isn’t very complicated, and involves a single main space with a kitchen and bathroom on either side. The walls now move, and contain certain helpful integrations like a folding murphy bed and a prep table that pops out. There’s also a blackboard Pila can use during meetings when working at home.



You’ll Do a Double-Take When You See This Modern Tiny Home


Designed, built, and currently on sale by Greenleaf Tiny Homes of Eugene, Oregon, this model called the Kootenay Urban Tiny House is 240 sqaure feet and exactly what you didn’t know you needed in you life – until now. Maybe you thought living in a tiny space wouldn’t work. Well, just take a look at this gorgeous example and maybe you’ll have a change of heart!

The front exterior view of your future mobile tiny home. The front door is built into the side of the home to allow for a fold-down cedar deck and front steps.


The siding of the home is sikkins-finished oak and powder-coated steel. The back door, leading into the bathroom. can be replaced with a wall, window, or sink.


The throne of your tiny castle. Not pictured is the stainless steel shower with a removable ipe wood floor, convenient for cleaning.


The front nook area and front entryway into the home.


A view of the front nook area from the kitchen. This kitchen includes a full-size fridge, gas stove top, and a washer and dryer combo, but is designed to be versatile enough to handle more appliances!


Did we mention that there were also floating shelves in this kitchen?


Wow, appearances are deceiving! This kitchen sure knows how to conceal its storage space!


A view of the downstairs living area and a glimpse of the bedroom loft. The flooring is engineered oak downstairs, and cork upstairs. The windows are double-paned.


The bedroom loft provides the foolproof vantage point for meditation and home surveillance.


The most luxurious and spacious bedroom loft that anyone could ask for.


He Made His PubShed Incredible With 5,500 Pennies

With the growing trend of “pubsheds” comes an increasing amount of creativity, as demonstrated by this guy who turned a simple shed dubbed “The Barn” into a very creative backyard bar where he and his buddies can hang out and enjoy a couple drinks. What makes his build unique though is the peculiar use of a whopping 5,500 pennies which he incorporated into the design. Check it out below.

The gabled barn style shed looks nice on the outside…


Yet the inside was lacking in proper bar decor, so he went to work building a bar.


The bar itself isn’t too fancy…yet.

pub-shed-penny-bar-06 pub-shed-penny-bar-07

Here’s where he starts to get creative, setting aside $55 worth of pennies for special use.


He even sorted the pennies, keeping the pre-1982 ones from the rest. Talk about commitment!


Before using the pennies, he decided to soak them in vinegar and salt, which removes the oxidization and brings them back to a shiny new state.


But he also left half of them to dry without polishing, which created a nice variation in the color for his project.


Then he set to work, laying the pennies in a diamond pattern according to their shades of color.


You might notice every penny is facing heads up.


Finally he slathered four quarts of resin over the top, using a blowtorch to remove any bubbles, and was left with a beautiful surface on his new bar.


And of course he installed a kegerator to dispense ice cold brews for him and his friends.


The completed project on display, with three local Virginia beers on tap!


Images via Imgur | American Standard

How Do You Throw A Party In A Tiny House? Get Down To The Tiny Basics.

Josh and Shelley like to keep a fully stocked bar and enjoy hosting friends and family, but they faced a challenge when making the decision to downsize into a tiny house. As cute as tiny houses are, they don’t work so well for hosting parties and entertaining unless you literally want to rub shoulders with people. But thanks to an extraordinary design and some help from the crew of FYI’s “Tiny House Nation” they seem to have it all figured out.

The 224-square-foot home includes two lofts, with one used for sleeping and the other for Shelley to get ready. The bedroom loft has all sorts of clever built-in storage hidden in the floor, which keeps clutter to a minimum. Downstairs you’ll find a living/kitchen area with an open floorplan, and perhaps best of all a large pass-through window that connects to the outdoor bar, where up to 8 people can hang out comfortably!

It’s safe to say that when you add up the extra deck space, seating at the bar, and the surrounding yard, this couple has truly figured out how to live big in a tiny house!

Follow their journey at

Small House Compromise Yields High Return On Freedom

Maybe the idea of a tiny house appeals to you, but the practicality not so much. For small families and empty-nesters who need a bit more space for their things, a small house might fit their needs perfectly. That’s what Lily Copenagle and Jamie Kennel found out as they crafted their “just right” sized home that comes in at 704 sq. feet.


The couple had a simple mission – to build a small, sustainable home that’s easy to clean, with an open and spacious feel to it. They began with a $190k property, which was quickly razed to allow a clean slate. They proceeded to work with a contractor to get the new home started, and did much of the work themselves.



By working on the project themselves, the couple saved a decent chunk of money, and kept the overall costs to around $135k, resulting in a total of just over $300k spent. They finished the project in 2012, paid off the mortgage in full, and currently pay just $370/month in utilities and bills.


Their neighbor remarked, “On weekends, they actually go places and do things. They’re not tied to the projects most of us are tied to. I’m so charmed by the simplicity of it.” The same neighbor also said they probably couldn’t share a closet with their spouse, but we have to imagine that it’s a fair trade off to have the financial security of owning the home, and the flexibility to travel freely.shedsTwo green-roofed sheds in the backyard provide extra storage for the couple’s miscellaneous items and a workspace. The city also awarded them a $9k reimbursement for the green roofs. Below you can see the small shared office space they allocated in the floor plan.



The laundry setup isn’t exactly normal, but then again, it makes putting laundry away after washing/drying quite easy.


Photos by Aaron Leitz for The New York Times


Despite their ability to afford a much larger home, this couple made a concious decision to live modestly, below their means, and it seems they are reaping the benefits. While some friends, family, and architects questioned their decision, Lily and Jamie have no regrets.

This Is What Happens When Architects Design Shelters For Cats

As if cats doing adorable things in weird contexts need any explanation. Feast your eyes on these creative design experiments that focus on the space occupied by everybody’s favorite felines.

cat arch1 Yarn? YARN!cat arch2 Stop. Just arch3 Everyone can see you hiding there, arch4 A saucer of scotch with my mahogany, please. 
cat arch5 I should not have had so much catnip. cat arch6 Make house for cat. Cat sits underneath house.

cat arch7

Should’ve dibsed top bunk.

The structures were built and put on display as part of an awareness project called “Giving Shelter” put on by Architects for Animals. The shelters were designed by various architects in the Las Angeles area and presented at a local Herman Miller showroom in Culver City, CA.

Stroke Of Genius Allows Artist & Family To Live Comfortably In A Tiny Apartment

Sometimes a splash of orange and a squiggle of purple is all you need to make a small, otherwise mundane space shine. This tiny apartment in France was taken over by artist/architect Cyril Rheims along with his wife and daughter, and he brought a creative approach to the layout that allows them to live comfortably in the tiny 485 square foot apartment. The space was transformed into a functional puzzle box that bursts with vibrant accents of color via furniture, linens and various wall and floor treatments.


The loft apartment encompasses 485sf of floor space, needing every bit of it to have enough space for a growing family. The bed is set up on a raised platform that contains storage drawers underneath. The ‘bedroom’ is sectioned off by a framed opening that defines the separate spaces, but remains one open space.

Accents of color give the otherwise clean space a personal charm, and prove appropriate for an artistic family with a small child.

cyril-rheims-small-apartment-paris-3 A multi-colored tiled patch of floor defines the kitchen and dining areas. It’s a clever trick, and breaks the space up to make it feel larger and more functional.

cyril-rheims-small-apartment-paris-4 The structure has been painted dark to contrast the lightness of the walls and cabinetry, giving them a prominent role in the space’s hierarchy.



In case you’ve been wondering about the exposed bathroom, which looks great for exhibitionists, but not so much for normal folk who value privacy, it uses blind screens when necessary.

cyrilIf you’d like to learn more about Cyril, his artwork, and interior designs, check out his website at

The Acacia from Minamaliste

Welcome to the Acacia, the fifth home built by French/Canadian company Minimaliste. This home features some seriously eye-catching design elements, and borrows a lot of “big home” feel for such a small space.

There’s a 4-burner stove, a couch that converts to a bed, fold down dining/work table, and much more!

A $300 Chill Cabin For Sexing And Reading. You Decide.

Deek of is like a tiny house renaissance man, with a talent for building tiny dwellings in the wild, sometimes constructing one in a matter of hours. This one could be for reading as he claims, but I think I know what the real reason is, a sweet love shack. Just throw a little day bed in there, and replace the books with a few bottles of whiskey and maybe box with some adult smoking materials. Or leave the books. That’s great too.