Small & Tiny

Home Architecture Small & Tiny

How Do You Throw A Party In A Tiny House? Get Down To The Tiny Basics.

Josh and Shelley like to keep a fully stocked bar and enjoy hosting friends and family, but they faced a challenge when making the decision to downsize into a tiny house. As cute as tiny houses are, they don’t work so well for hosting parties and entertaining unless you literally want to rub shoulders with people. But thanks to an extraordinary design and some help from the crew of FYI’s “Tiny House Nation” they seem to have it all figured out.

The 224-square-foot home includes two lofts, with one used for sleeping and the other for Shelley to get ready. The bedroom loft has all sorts of clever built-in storage hidden in the floor, which keeps clutter to a minimum. Downstairs you’ll find a living/kitchen area with an open floorplan, and perhaps best of all a large pass-through window that connects to the outdoor bar, where up to 8 people can hang out comfortably!

It’s safe to say that when you add up the extra deck space, seating at the bar, and the surrounding yard, this couple has truly figured out how to live big in a tiny house!

Follow their journey at http://tinyhousebasics.com

Luxurious Minimalist Beach House On The Hamptons

Over 40 years ago a couple purchased a small, 1/4 acre lot of land just 500 feet away from the Atlantic shore. At the time, they didn’t have the means to develop a house there, and as the years went by the local zoning ordinances changed. When the time finally came for them to build a home, they had to work within the confines of those limitations, which meant building very small.

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As a result of the regulations, they had to work with a 15′ x 20′ footprint and two stories; the home could only be 600 square feet at most. Those regulations also forced them to consider the geometry of the house, as FEMA required the first floor to be elevated 6′ above natural grade and the town restricted the height to 25′ above natural grade.

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Photos by Bates Masi + Architects

Off-the-Grid Sustainable Masterpiece of New Zealand

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Jeff Hobbs, ex-boat and cabinet-maker, founded his newest venture, Room to Move, in anticipation that the tiny house movement would continue its momentum and to introduce the movement to the people of New Zealand. In this project for his client, Briar Hale, the craftsmanship, attention to detail, and meticulous planning that Jeff puts into his work is showcased flawlessly in the end result of this home. This tiny home was built in the spirit of sustainability, from the solar panels to the salvaged native wood used for construction material. New Zealand should be proud to host these futuristic, sustainable homes!

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home’s sustainability.

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for providing the home with hot water.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for water-heating.

The kitchen in all of its glory: kauri bench tops, hand-crafted ceramic sink, gas stove, and a 130-liter solar fridge.

The kitchen is fully featured, with kauri bench tops, a hand crafted ceramic sink, gas stove-oven, and a 130 liter solar fridge. All available spaces haven been transformed to offer ample storage.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for sleepless nights of stargazing.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for stargazing and access to the various systems on the roof.

A Wartime Bunker Is A Good Place For A Home, Right? Right!

Netherlands based architecture firm B-ILD have transformed this decrepit, ancient war-time bunker into a cool, rustic-chic getaway. I’d be the first to keep my arm down in a show of hands of people who thought a dank old bomb shelter would make a good place to reside, but seeing this project might have just changed my mind. It’s an unorthodox adaptive re-use project that, at first glance, doesn’t have a lot going for it. Upon closer look, that’s exactly what the architect used to craft a majestic underground dwelling.

The ironic thing is that B-UILD’s additions are minimal and strategic, allowing the weathered board-formed concrete walls to define the aesthetic of the space. It’s a move that pays off in the end, turning the very thing that made the space desolate into what makes it shine. The bunker is small, occupying only 118 square feet of floor area. As a space saver, the sleeping area deploys barracks-style bunk beds; an appropriate nod to a common war-time building type.

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Tiny 690sf Farmhouse Is Perfect Inside And Out!

Think living in a 690sf house wouldn’t work for you? Think again! This is a prime example of what you can do with a small space. From the decor to the layout, everything is just about perfect.

Every inch, inside and out, is just wonderful!

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You Won’t Believe What One Woman Turned This Old Garage Into

Take a good look at this garage and think about what you see. Pretty ordinary, run-of-the-mill, single door car hole, right?

00168152 Wrong.

Contained within that beat up, outdated, poorly painted relic of a structure lives one woman’s inspiration, and the potential to become her dream home. What she transformed that garage into is nothing short of incredible. Take a look.
00168162 Meet Michelle de la Vega of Seattle, Washington. Artist, designer, welder and visionary. Michelle put her creative inclinations to extraordinary use when designing and building this 250 square foot sanctuary.00168172 Many home-grown renovations have a tendency to look…well…amateur. Not this abode. The details and finishes were planned with meticulous and professional method, resulting in a clean, well-organized space.00168182 00168192 It may not look like your traditional kitchen, but it’s full of character and charm. The tiny home boasts a full bathroom, living/dining space, and lofted bed area in addition to this modest kitchen. Not bad for 250 SF.00168202 The fireplace is a central feature and adds a touch of rustic flair, accompanied by Michelle’s own art work!0016821200168232 The bathroom is highlighted by a large soaking tub and an abundance of natural light thanks to the appropriately placed skylight above.00168242 00168252Michelle certainly has a knack for finding beauty in discarded items. After transforming a decrepit shell of an old garage into this incredible home, she filled it with up-cycled furniture like this weathered storage locker.

If you’d like to know more about Michelle and her artwork, follow this link: Michelle de la Vega.

The 256sf Kokosing Makes Tiny Living Feel Luxuriously Doable

With its white and gray color scheme matched against the brown hickory hardwood, the Kokosing nails the whole modern farmhouse style perfectly. Add the giant farmhouse sink,  white quartz countertops, full size fridge, built in washer, high end appliances, and plenty of creative nooks for storage and you have a tiny home that’s completely styled out and 100% livable.

The $20k house anyone can afford, and everyone will want

The homes built by the Rural Studio’s $20k Project will be among the first commercially available one-bedroom homes available for $20,000 or less, with the simple goal of building beautiful and elegant homes that could easily be a part of a neighborhood of million-dollar houses yet be realistically attainable to and desired by the average person.

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Students of the Rural Studio, an undergraduate program of Auburn University’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, have finally begun the process of bringing years of planning and inspiration into reality with the building of the first homes of the $20k Project. The homes of the $20k Project have been designed with painstaking attention to every detail and using construction techniques that not only help reduce costs, but also make the homes more efficient and sustainable.

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After a pilot launch last January, the Rural Studio hopes to launch the $20k Project nation-wide; once so, they hope to give away the instructions so that anyone could build these homes on their own. The Studio has estimated that the cost of building supplies could be $14,000 or less. Could you see yourself living in one of these homes?

Photos: Jessica Ashley Photography

The Reason LA Wants To Destroying This Tiny House Community? Deporable!

Elvis Summers, he himself once homeless, decided to take the city of Los Angeles’ homelessness problem into his own hands with the launch of his humanitarian organization My Tiny House Project LA. As quoted from the organization’s website, “We have a simple mission: to give people in the world a safe place to sleep. While this should be a trivial quest in a developed country, without governmental support or social infrastructure that should be empathetic to those suffering, it can be incredibly difficult to create change.”

Elvis Summers poses with his tiny house on wheels he built.
Elvis Summers poses with his tiny house on wheels he built.

Due to the tireless efforts of Mr. Summers and volunteers, My Tiny House Project LA has distributed these colorful homes no bigger than a garden shed to individuals living in homeless encampments.

An example of the tiny homes built by Elvis Summers and the volunteers of My Tiny House Project LA.
An example of the tiny homes built by Elvis Summers and the volunteers of My Tiny House Project LA.

However, the city of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation is cracking down and confiscating these homes with the intention to discard them. The Bureau has classified the homes of My Tiny House Project LA as “bulky objects,” which, according to city ordinances, allows for them to be removed without notice.

Damian Dovarganes/AP
Damian Dovarganes/AP

The Bureau of Sanitation offers no alternatives to the occupants of the homes, often taking their few possessions along with the homes. “I don’t refer to these as homes or houses because they’re really not,” said Bureau of Sanitation spokeswoman Elena Stern.

Mr. Summers spoke with the LA Times in this video below in regards to this agonizing situation, in particular the situation Larry Joe Cannon and his wife of 14 years, Julia Briggs Cannon.

For more information about My Tiny House Project LA, or to make a donation to the organization, visit My Tiny House Project LA’s official website or Facebook page:

http://www.mythpla.org/home.html

www.facebook.com/mythpla

The Acacia from Minamaliste

Welcome to the Acacia, the fifth home built by French/Canadian company Minimaliste. This home features some seriously eye-catching design elements, and borrows a lot of “big home” feel for such a small space.

There’s a 4-burner stove, a couch that converts to a bed, fold down dining/work table, and much more!