Small & Tiny

Home Architecture Small & Tiny

The $20k house anyone can afford, and everyone will want

The homes built by the Rural Studio’s $20k Project will be among the first commercially available one-bedroom homes available for $20,000 or less, with the simple goal of building beautiful and elegant homes that could easily be a part of a neighborhood of million-dollar houses yet be realistically attainable to and desired by the average person.

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Students of the Rural Studio, an undergraduate program of Auburn University’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, have finally begun the process of bringing years of planning and inspiration into reality with the building of the first homes of the $20k Project. The homes of the $20k Project have been designed with painstaking attention to every detail and using construction techniques that not only help reduce costs, but also make the homes more efficient and sustainable.

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After a pilot launch last January, the Rural Studio hopes to launch the $20k Project nation-wide; once so, they hope to give away the instructions so that anyone could build these homes on their own. The Studio has estimated that the cost of building supplies could be $14,000 or less. Could you see yourself living in one of these homes?

Photos: Jessica Ashley Photography

Tiny 690sf Farmhouse Is Perfect Inside And Out!

Think living in a 690sf house wouldn’t work for you? Think again! This is a prime example of what you can do with a small space. From the decor to the layout, everything is just about perfect.

Every inch, inside and out, is just wonderful!

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Tiny Home Has One Incredible Space-Saving Feature You Must See

Tiny houses have gone mainstream, and with the increasing number of builds we’re seeing all sorts of creative ideas when it comes to making the most out of a small space. This modern style tiny home from Australia is just the latest example, and what makes it stand out is the creative use of a bed that raises or lowers to make extra space.

Aside from the clean modern design, this tiny house also features a detachable porch which further adds to the visual appeal and makes for a great little spot to hang out.

Images © TinyHouseCompany.com.au

15 Outlandish Homes Pushing The Limits Of Creativity

The world is a strange and beautiful place. Each of these 15 homes proves that we are not limited by conventional thought when it comes to designing and creating something truly unique. Using what we can find, what we know, and what we think we can learn, the world can become just a little bit stranger, and a lot more beautiful.

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Students Design Retro-Rustic Offgrid Nomad Camper For Easy Towing

The housing crisis may be over, but plenty of people all over still face the challenge of trying to find a place to call home. This retro-rustic styled dwelling is one of the prototypes from +FARM‘s summer design studio, where students immerse themselves in design and construction practices, attempting to bring new solutions to fruition.

The 2015 Nomad Studio shown here is modest, but beautiful, with a tiny 8′ x 5′ interior that sleeps two and quickly transforms into a lounge space. It has deployable solar panels that create 1kw, powering the coffee maker and film projector, and there’s even a stowable composting toilet hidden away.

Photos courtesy Andrew Nisbet

You Won’t Believe What One Woman Turned This Old Garage Into

Take a good look at this garage and think about what you see. Pretty ordinary, run-of-the-mill, single door car hole, right?

00168152 Wrong.

Contained within that beat up, outdated, poorly painted relic of a structure lives one woman’s inspiration, and the potential to become her dream home. What she transformed that garage into is nothing short of incredible. Take a look.
00168162 Meet Michelle de la Vega of Seattle, Washington. Artist, designer, welder and visionary. Michelle put her creative inclinations to extraordinary use when designing and building this 250 square foot sanctuary.00168172 Many home-grown renovations have a tendency to look…well…amateur. Not this abode. The details and finishes were planned with meticulous and professional method, resulting in a clean, well-organized space.00168182 00168192 It may not look like your traditional kitchen, but it’s full of character and charm. The tiny home boasts a full bathroom, living/dining space, and lofted bed area in addition to this modest kitchen. Not bad for 250 SF.00168202 The fireplace is a central feature and adds a touch of rustic flair, accompanied by Michelle’s own art work!0016821200168232 The bathroom is highlighted by a large soaking tub and an abundance of natural light thanks to the appropriately placed skylight above.00168242 00168252Michelle certainly has a knack for finding beauty in discarded items. After transforming a decrepit shell of an old garage into this incredible home, she filled it with up-cycled furniture like this weathered storage locker.

If you’d like to know more about Michelle and her artwork, follow this link: Michelle de la Vega.

He Built A Romantic Forest Getaway For His New Wife In Just 6 Weeks For $4,000

$4,000, 6 weeks, and a whole lot of love was all it took for long-time carpenter Dave Herrle to design and build this tiny forest cabin. It’s a feat that is nothing short of astounding and one that invites skeptical curiosity as we ask ourselves: “How the heck did he do that?” For the price of a 12 year old Honda Civic Mr. Herrle has utilized found materials, salvaged parts, and a heaping spoonful of creativity to craft a little piece of heaven to call his own.

It was far from easy, but just what Dave and his fiancée needed.

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“For the longest time I had a hard time not being “normal.” I graduated from a small liberal arts college, got a desk job, and hated every minute of it. In 2007 my life changed dramatically after hiking the entirety of the Appalachian Trail. It was a gut check in life and I’m lucky it happened when I was 27 and not 67. My time in the woods gave me a perspective on the benefits of simplicity. It was in the woods that I promised myself that I wouldn’t spend a lifetime doing a job I didn’t enjoy.”

It’s a romantic sentiment, and one I’m sure we’ve all had when dreaming about when sitting in our cars on the freeway or staring blankly at a sprawling Excel spreadsheet. Dave took what he had and applied what he knew to make that dream a reality.

tiny-house-4000-dave-herrle-2.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart The structure uses large trees as the anchors of the foundation, eliminating the need for a costly concrete base. tiny-house-4000-dave-herrle-3.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart The footprint is small (only 10×14 feet), but highly functional. The couple added plenty of personal flair to make it their home.tiny-house-4000-dave-herrle-4.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart Like many tiny homes, going vertical is important for saving space. A lofted bed area sits over the ample kitchen.tiny-house-4000-dave-herrle-5.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart tiny-house-4000-dave-herrle-6.jpg.650x0_q70_crop-smart Dave continues to run his carpentry business, and has recently moved on to building inexpensive tiny homes for others, as well. Find out more about his work at Herrle Custom Carpentry.
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This Cabin Is Missing Something All Buildings Have, And It Rocks Because Of It

Who needs doors, right? That’s exactly what Nat Cheshire of Cheshire Architects said when he designed this pair of isolated structures off the coast of New Zealand. The cabins are completely open air and can be entered via a large square opening that steps you down into the main living area. The interiors are simple and clean, utilizing the warmth of native wood to tie the spaces to the adjacent landscape.

There is modesty and serenity in the way the buildings are anchored to the hillside. A quick glance would make them seem as if they were dark boulders jutting up and out of the grassy plains that carpet the surrounding countryside. They become a part of the iconic terrain rather than fight to visually overpower it. This harmony is echoed by the openness that results from having no doors. Protection might be limited, but the visceral experience is not.

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A Wartime Bunker Is A Good Place For A Home, Right? Right!

Netherlands based architecture firm B-ILD have transformed this decrepit, ancient war-time bunker into a cool, rustic-chic getaway. I’d be the first to keep my arm down in a show of hands of people who thought a dank old bomb shelter would make a good place to reside, but seeing this project might have just changed my mind. It’s an unorthodox adaptive re-use project that, at first glance, doesn’t have a lot going for it. Upon closer look, that’s exactly what the architect used to craft a majestic underground dwelling.

The ironic thing is that B-UILD’s additions are minimal and strategic, allowing the weathered board-formed concrete walls to define the aesthetic of the space. It’s a move that pays off in the end, turning the very thing that made the space desolate into what makes it shine. The bunker is small, occupying only 118 square feet of floor area. As a space saver, the sleeping area deploys barracks-style bunk beds; an appropriate nod to a common war-time building type.

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Brilliant Design Makes This The Most Beautiful Trailer Home We’ve Seen

Don’t think you’d ever live in a trailer home? You might reconsider after laying eyes on this creative masterpiece. Located in Austin, Texas, this very unique home is actually made from two trailers allowing it to be moved easily. Though small, at just 400 square feet, it’s big on style thanks in part to the genius of interior designer Kim Lewis.

Clean lines, rich textures, and a balance of neutral white/black with splashes of color bring a ton of personality into the space. The salvaged flooring came from a 1960s home in Austin.

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The breezeway includes a pair of dog houses nested under the bench, and make for a cozy place for their two rescues to catch some Z’s.

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The slim kitchen features plenty of space to prep thanks in part to a movable island. Instead of a refrigerator, the owners use two small refrigerator drawers.

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Slim barn doors made from perforated copper panels help save space and look amazing. The “You look good” tile pattern also adds a playful touch.

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Behind the bed on the trailer’s gooseneck you’ll find a spacious closet that also includes a 2-in-1 washer/dryer.

skwKYT8G4zgx t5dl-pvwoAzxThe two owners of this home moved from Colorado to Austin to start their second urban winery business, and the home doubles as a tasting room. Thanks to the team at Tiny House Nation and the brilliance of Kim Lewis they were able to make their dream home a reality.

The curb appeal starts at the colorful steps and reaches every inch of the exterior. The spacious deck offers extra space for entertaining, and we love the hammock draped between the two planters. Based on the results we imagine they won’t have a problem impressing guests, wherever they decide to take their trailer home.

(Image credits: Lonny)