Architecture

Home Architecture

The Reason LA Wants To Destroying This Tiny House Community? Deporable!

Elvis Summers, he himself once homeless, decided to take the city of Los Angeles’ homelessness problem into his own hands with the launch of his humanitarian organization My Tiny House Project LA. As quoted from the organization’s website, “We have a simple mission: to give people in the world a safe place to sleep. While this should be a trivial quest in a developed country, without governmental support or social infrastructure that should be empathetic to those suffering, it can be incredibly difficult to create change.”

Elvis Summers poses with his tiny house on wheels he built.
Elvis Summers poses with his tiny house on wheels he built.

Due to the tireless efforts of Mr. Summers and volunteers, My Tiny House Project LA has distributed these colorful homes no bigger than a garden shed to individuals living in homeless encampments.

An example of the tiny homes built by Elvis Summers and the volunteers of My Tiny House Project LA.
An example of the tiny homes built by Elvis Summers and the volunteers of My Tiny House Project LA.

However, the city of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation is cracking down and confiscating these homes with the intention to discard them. The Bureau has classified the homes of My Tiny House Project LA as “bulky objects,” which, according to city ordinances, allows for them to be removed without notice.

Damian Dovarganes/AP
Damian Dovarganes/AP

The Bureau of Sanitation offers no alternatives to the occupants of the homes, often taking their few possessions along with the homes. “I don’t refer to these as homes or houses because they’re really not,” said Bureau of Sanitation spokeswoman Elena Stern.

Mr. Summers spoke with the LA Times in this video below in regards to this agonizing situation, in particular the situation Larry Joe Cannon and his wife of 14 years, Julia Briggs Cannon.

For more information about My Tiny House Project LA, or to make a donation to the organization, visit My Tiny House Project LA’s official website or Facebook page:

http://www.mythpla.org/home.html

www.facebook.com/mythpla

Off-the-Grid Sustainable Masterpiece of New Zealand

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Jeff Hobbs, ex-boat and cabinet-maker, founded his newest venture, Room to Move, in anticipation that the tiny house movement would continue its momentum and to introduce the movement to the people of New Zealand. In this project for his client, Briar Hale, the craftsmanship, attention to detail, and meticulous planning that Jeff puts into his work is showcased flawlessly in the end result of this home. This tiny home was built in the spirit of sustainability, from the solar panels to the salvaged native wood used for construction material. New Zealand should be proud to host these futuristic, sustainable homes!

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home’s sustainability.

The roof hosts a 600-watt solar panel and rainwater collection system, contributing to the home's sustainability.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for providing the home with hot water.

Among other clever space-saving features, this L-shaped sofa conceals a double bed. The wood stove is another sustainable feature responsible for water-heating.

The kitchen in all of its glory: kauri bench tops, hand-crafted ceramic sink, gas stove, and a 130-liter solar fridge.

The kitchen is fully featured, with kauri bench tops, a hand crafted ceramic sink, gas stove-oven, and a 130 liter solar fridge. All available spaces haven been transformed to offer ample storage.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for sleepless nights of stargazing.

The cavernous bedroom loft with a skylight for stargazing and access to the various systems on the roof.

You’ll Do a Double-Take When You See This Modern Tiny Home

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Designed, built, and currently on sale by Greenleaf Tiny Homes of Eugene, Oregon, this model called the Kootenay Urban Tiny House is 240 sqaure feet and exactly what you didn’t know you needed in you life – until now. Maybe you thought living in a tiny space wouldn’t work. Well, just take a look at this gorgeous example and maybe you’ll have a change of heart!

The front exterior view of your future mobile tiny home. The front door is built into the side of the home to allow for a fold-down cedar deck and front steps.

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The siding of the home is sikkins-finished oak and powder-coated steel. The back door, leading into the bathroom. can be replaced with a wall, window, or sink.

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The throne of your tiny castle. Not pictured is the stainless steel shower with a removable ipe wood floor, convenient for cleaning.

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The front nook area and front entryway into the home.

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A view of the front nook area from the kitchen. This kitchen includes a full-size fridge, gas stove top, and a washer and dryer combo, but is designed to be versatile enough to handle more appliances!

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Did we mention that there were also floating shelves in this kitchen?

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Wow, appearances are deceiving! This kitchen sure knows how to conceal its storage space!

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A view of the downstairs living area and a glimpse of the bedroom loft. The flooring is engineered oak downstairs, and cork upstairs. The windows are double-paned.

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The bedroom loft provides the foolproof vantage point for meditation and home surveillance.

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The most luxurious and spacious bedroom loft that anyone could ask for.

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He wanted to build a simple cottage, but ended up with a massive castle

Jim's initial incorporation of ironwork was purely ornamental, but is now used structurally along with steel to secure the castle's foundation.

Every man’s home is his castle, a sentiment Jim Bishop took to heart when he began construction on his namesake project, Bishop Castle, in 1969 at the age of 25 in Wetmore, Colorado.

Jim Bishop on the balcony of his castle.
Jim Bishop on the balcony of his castle.

Jim Bishop bought the two-and-a-half acre of land just outside the limits of the San Isabel National Forest ten years earlier for $450 at just 15. The land was used by his family for the occasional camping trip until his marriage in 1967, when he was then inspired to begin the construction of a simple stone cottage for him and his wife on their property. The inspiration to build a castle came when the issue of installing a water tank arose. An iron worker by trade, this was an easy feat for him to accomplish. However, upon the remarks of family and friends that the iron and stone work he had chosen for building materials made the cottage look rather as if he were building a castle, he decided to switch gears and do just that: build a castle. Why not?

Jim's initial incorporation of ironwork was purely ornamental, but is now used structurally along with steel to secure the castle's foundation.
Jim’s initial incorporation of ironwork was purely ornamental, but is now used structurally along with steel to secure the castle’s foundation.

In the beginning stages of his castle, word spread and many offered their help to Jim in the construction of the castle. But no one ever did come to help Jim build his castle, which did not deter him in the least from his vision. “By God, I’ve gotten this far by myself!” he declared. “If you want something done right, do it yourself!” So, for the next 40 years, Jim balanced his work as an iron worker with the construction of Bishop Castle, a project that only ever kept growing in size.

Jim Bishop at work on the iron work of his castle.
Jim Bishop at work on the iron work of his castle.

Like any construction project, occasional issues arose: a running dispute since resolved was with the San Isabel National Forest, where he collected the stones and rocks for the castle. Jim’s goal is to complete Bishop Castle in its entirety before he passes away. He still has many additions to his vision to complete before that time is nigh, among them being the installation of a moat and draw bridge, a balcony large enough to fit an orchestra, and even the construction of a second castle!

One of the entrance signs to Bishop Castle with Jim's terms and conditions to visitors.
One of the entrance signs to Bishop Castle with Jim’s terms and conditions to visitors.

Until then, Bishop Castle is open to visitors as an official tourist attraction, as listed by the state of Colorado’s Chamber of Commerce. The price of admission to Jim Bishop’s legacy is a donation to the (continuing) construction costs.

Tiny House Built For Adventure & Designed For Comfort

The dining area's chalkboard wall would be excellent for planning a day's surveying of the lands over breakfast.

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For the price of $104 per night, you can rent the Lewis and Clark Tiny House #1, built on rural Montana property near the banks of Skalkaho Creek. You probably wouldn’t bat an eye should this country cabin bear a sign reading “Lewis and Clark slept here,” but this unpolished, rural dwelling hosts a plethora of modern amenities that would be unrecognizable to the surveyors of lore such are wireless internet; a fully equipped kitchen with a refrigerator, toaster oven, microwave, hot plate, coffee maker, and cookware; a bathroom with a shower/tub, complete with a composting toilet; and a mini gas heater for those cold nights out on the open territory.

The dining area's chalkboard wall would be excellent for planning a day's surveying of the lands over breakfast.
The dining area’s chalkboard wall would be excellent for planning a day’s surveying of the lands over breakfast.
A formal parlor in the wilderness.
A formal parlor in the wilderness.
The living room, complete with requisite animal skin rug and a flat-screen TV. The ideal place to unwind or review the additions and revisions you've made to your maps.
The living room, complete with requisite animal skin rug and a flat-screen TV. The ideal place to unwind or review the additions and revisions you’ve made to your maps.
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Just off the living room, one may find the kitchen stocked with pantry essentials such as sugar, coffee, tea, oil, and basic spices.
Fall into this full-size Murphy bed at the end of a long day of fishing and blazing the trail.
What was once the dining area has transformed into the bed chamber! Fall into this full-size Murphy bed at the end of a long day of fishing and blazing the trail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This Amazing Rustic Home Was Once A Shipping Container

Custom Container Living of Missouri specializes in converting shipping containers into the tiny home of your dreams. Take a look at their current 215-square foot offering.

Come on in! This house may be compact, but it certainly does use its opportunities for storage space!

Come on in!

Custom Container Living builds these homes to fit anyone’s individual needs, whether you’re in the market for a cabin by the lake or a detached office. This rustic listing would certainly meet the requirements of the former!

A view of the living room and kitchen.

A view of the living room and kitchen.

The kitchen cabinets are made of birch and the counter top is made of Formica, of which a 22-inch overhang allows for a built-in dining area, and the appliances are stainless steel. This home even includes a washer and dryer built into the side of the refrigerator!

Note the built-in storage underneath the staircase!

An expanded look at the interior, with the stairwell leading up to the bedroom loft. Note the built-in storage underneath the staircase! Washer and dryer not pictured.

The bedroom loft is large enough to accommodate a queen-size bed, and is also the perfect location to play Scrabble.

The bedroom loft is large enough to accommodate a queen-size bed, and is also the perfect location to play Scrabble.

 

The $20k house anyone can afford, and everyone will want

The homes built by the Rural Studio’s $20k Project will be among the first commercially available one-bedroom homes available for $20,000 or less, with the simple goal of building beautiful and elegant homes that could easily be a part of a neighborhood of million-dollar houses yet be realistically attainable to and desired by the average person.

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Students of the Rural Studio, an undergraduate program of Auburn University’s School of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, have finally begun the process of bringing years of planning and inspiration into reality with the building of the first homes of the $20k Project. The homes of the $20k Project have been designed with painstaking attention to every detail and using construction techniques that not only help reduce costs, but also make the homes more efficient and sustainable.

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After a pilot launch last January, the Rural Studio hopes to launch the $20k Project nation-wide; once so, they hope to give away the instructions so that anyone could build these homes on their own. The Studio has estimated that the cost of building supplies could be $14,000 or less. Could you see yourself living in one of these homes?

Photos: Jessica Ashley Photography

Tiny 690sf Farmhouse Is Perfect Inside And Out!

Think living in a 690sf house wouldn’t work for you? Think again! This is a prime example of what you can do with a small space. From the decor to the layout, everything is just about perfect.

Every inch, inside and out, is just wonderful!

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Tiny Home Has One Incredible Space-Saving Feature You Must See

Tiny houses have gone mainstream, and with the increasing number of builds we’re seeing all sorts of creative ideas when it comes to making the most out of a small space. This modern style tiny home from Australia is just the latest example, and what makes it stand out is the creative use of a bed that raises or lowers to make extra space.

Aside from the clean modern design, this tiny house also features a detachable porch which further adds to the visual appeal and makes for a great little spot to hang out.

Images © TinyHouseCompany.com.au

15 Outlandish Homes Pushing The Limits Of Creativity

The world is a strange and beautiful place. Each of these 15 homes proves that we are not limited by conventional thought when it comes to designing and creating something truly unique. Using what we can find, what we know, and what we think we can learn, the world can become just a little bit stranger, and a lot more beautiful.

14Thai Dome Home.

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